Flower Bomb

So, after more than 6 months I managed to pick up my crochet hook again to make something new. I did do a few rows of a blanket in January, when my parents were here, but I don’t count that.  It was too rushed and I just did it for the sake of doing it, not really for the enjoyment of crochet, choosing colours and pattern and thinking about the modifications!  Now I’m doing it all!
I chose the Flower Crochet Amish Puzzle Ball, a free pattern by Dedri, from Look at What I Made. It’s colourful, it’s easy and I already have all the yarn I need to finish it. But more importantly, it’s a small motif pattern, so I can get bits of it done in the short intervals between Henry’s feed-play-sleep cycle.
I’m not really changing the pattern but for one detail.  At the beginning of the petals round, I don’t start with a loop and 2 chains as the pattern says.  I do an “air stitch”. I discovered I could start a stitch with a new strand of yarn without having to attach the yarn to the work. I didn’t invent this technique, and probably not it’s name either, but I like it. Here’s how I do it.

Start with a slipknot

Start with a slipknot

Then, carefully, wrap the yarn over the hook once (or as many times as required to make the stitch you want). Keep the slipknot firmly held in place.

Then, carefully, wrap the yarn over the hook once (or as many times as required to make the stitch you want). Keep the slipknot firmly held in place.

Insert the hook in the base stitch.

Insert the hook in the base stitch.

Yarn over and pull through the stitch...

Yarn over and pull through the stitch…

Flower Bomb 7

…nearly there…

... and finish the stitch as usual.

… and finish the stitch as usual.

When making my Rainbow Blanket I used the air stitch in the middle of a row of DC and left a long tail to hide well into the fabric.  It looks secure and since the next row was also DC only, there is no visible gap between end of yarn and beginning of new yarn, but I can’t swear by it because the blanket is not in use yet. Let’s see what the future brings. It works well in the beginning of a row, with no difference from attaching the new yarn directly to the work.

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